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Sulphide Paperweights for Sale


Sulphides Paperweights are those that contain cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  Often the object is surrounded by a millefiori or lampwork garland, but it may also appear alone.  The finest sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sulphides are often closely related to historical events and famous people.

Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself.  Sometimes the sulphide material is not compatible with the glass and a fracture may develop.

The technique of encasing sulphide figures in glass dates from around 1750.  Initially, the sulphides were found in glass plaques, flasks, goblets, and other objects.  Paperweights came later.  Sulphides are found in antique and modern paperweights from many factories.  Three French factories made sulphides in significant quantieies during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s.  Midwest American makers also made popular designs during the same period.

You can read more about the Sulphide Paperweights in the books: If you are interested in purchasing any of these paperweights, e-mail me at: aport@paperweights.com
 
5148 Rare Baccarat 1987 Faneuil Hall Sulphide Paperweight - Shreve, Crump & Low Exclusive.   This modern Baccarat sulphide paperweight features a three dimensional image of the Faneuil Hall in Boston, Massachusetts.  The sulphide is an accurate representation of the building as it stood in the 1898 time frame.  This sulphide paperweight does not appear in any of the Baccarat catalog listings and appears to be a special offering created exclusively for Shreve, Crump & Low possibly as part of their "Museum Collection" exhibition or even the "Remembering Boston" series in 1987.  The May 17, 1987 Boston Globe advertisement (see picture) offering this paperweight states "Baccarat crystal … paperweight commemorating historic Boston ... Exclusively at Shreve’s $245".  The paperweight has a translucent cobalt blue foot and is signed with the etched Baccarat logo on the base.  It is also faceted with one large top facet and six side facets.  Faneuil Hall is one of the most popular locations in Boston to visit, shop, or have a meal.  This is an exceptional find for any collector of Baccarat paperweights or Boston memorabilia. 

Sulphides are cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  The finest French sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself. 

Baccarat was founded in 1776 in Alsace-Lorraine with the name of Verrerie de Sainte Anne.  The original location was near the town of Baccarat.  Today the firm is known as Compagnie des Cristalleries de Baccarat.  Most collectors refer to three periods of Baccarat paperweight production.

  • 1845-1860 - Classic period
  • 1920-1934 - Dupont period
  • 1953-2002 - Modern period
This classification is definitely an over simplification.  The best millefiori and lampwork paperweights were made during the classic period (1845-1860).   Baccarat continued to make paperweights after the classic period, but little is known about the extent of the product line or who made the paperweights.  What is known is that by 1910, the offering in the catalog had dwindled to pansy paperweights, simple open concentric paperweights, and rock paperweights.  Popular lore attributes 1920-1934 Baccarat paperweights to a Mr. Dupont, who supposedly was the last worker at Baccarat to know the secrets of paperweight making.  These paperweights were sold at a Baccarat retail shop in Paris. No collector or scholar ever met Mr. Dupont although at least one visited the Baccarat factory and asked to meet with him.  The weights stopped appearing in the shop in 1934.

New research of the Baccarat archives has identified the actual makers during the Dupont period as Joseph Boyé (1877-1948)and Louis Idoux (1882-1941).  Boyé is recorded as the maker of millefiori canes and millefiori paperweights during this period (1920-1934). Very little is known about Mr. Boyé, but there is enough similarity in the millefiori canes to suggest that he had access to the original molds or some of the original millefiori canes from the classic period.  He later trained another glassworker, Georges Brocard, to make open concentric paperweights in 1946.  Armed with this knowledge, Brocard was influential in the revival of paperweight making at Baccarat in the 1950s.  Louis Idoux is recorded as making the Baccarat pansy paperweights during the 1920-1934 period.

In 1952, Paul Jokelson approached Baccarat with the idea of making sulphide paperweights again.  In 1953 Baccarat resumed paperweight production with a series of sulphide paperweights the first of which were the unsuccessful Eisenhower sulphide followed by the Queen Elizabeth coronation sulphide.  Millefiori paperweight production was resumed in 1957 and lampwork paperweights were re-introduced in the early 1970s.  Baccarat stopped making this type of fine glass paperweights in 2002.

You can read more about the Baccarat paperweights in the new book Baccarat Paperweights - two centuries of beauty by Paul Dunlop or one of the older books on paperweights in general, such as The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights by Paul Hollister or World Paperweights by Robert Hall.

Large Size:  2 3/4" diameter by 1 7/16" high.    The paperweight has a translucent cobalt blue foot and is faceted with one large top facet and six side facets.   
Signature:   Signed with the Baccarat logo etched on the base.       
Condition:   Excellent condition.  There are some scratches on the base, but no other scratches, chips, or cracks found on inspection.   
 

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture of the paperweight
Close-up view
Shreve, Crump & Low Advertisement
Profile view
Base with etched Baccarat logo
Side view
$395 postage paid in the US.     

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

Click on the picture to see a larger image
Rare Baccarat 1987 Faneuil Hall Sulphide Paperweight - Shreve, Crump & Low Exclusive
5200 Rare Baccarat 1952-1953 Experimental or Prototype Dwight Eisenhower Sulphide Paperweight.   This modern sulphide paperweight features a three dimensional figure of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.  The sulphide was made directly from a campaign medal.  The Eisenhower sulphide was the first modern sulphide paperweight made by Baccarat and was considered experimental.  It preceded the larger editions produced later.  After much experimentation, Baccarat produced an edition of 153 of these paperweights, of which 103 were on a blue ground and 50 were on a clear ground.  An unknown number of those on a clear ground were finished with a diamond-cut base.  This example has a clear ground.  The sulphide is a bit cruder than others I have seen, indicating to me that this may be a prototype made to demonstrate feasibility.  The glass is heavy crystal typical of Baccarat paperweights, but it is unsigned.  

Note:  Please ignore the white areas, they are glare from the light.  

Sulphides are cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  The finest French sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself. 

Baccarat was founded in 1776 in Alsace-Lorraine with the name of Verrerie de Sainte Anne.  The original location was near the town of Baccarat.  Today the firm is known as Compagnie des Cristalleries de Baccarat.  Most collectors refer to three periods of Baccarat paperweight production.

  • 1845-1860 - Classic period
  • 1920-1934 - Dupont period
  • 1953-2002 - Modern period
This classification is definitely an over simplification.  The best millefiori and lampwork paperweights were made during the classic period (1845-1860).   Baccarat continued to make paperweights after the classic period, but little is known about the extent of the product line or who made the paperweights.  What is known is that by 1910, the offering in the catalog had dwindled to pansy paperweights, simple open concentric paperweights, and rock paperweights.  Popular lore attributes 1920-1934 Baccarat paperweights to a Mr. Dupont, who supposedly was the last worker at Baccarat to know the secrets of paperweight making.  These paperweights were sold at a Baccarat retail shop in Paris. No collector or scholar ever met Mr. Dupont although at least one visited the Baccarat factory and asked to meet with him.  The weights stopped appearing in the shop in 1934.

In 1952, Paul Jokelson approached Baccarat with the idea of making sulphide paperweights again.  In 1953 Baccarat resumed paperweight production with a series of sulphide paperweights the first of which were the unsuccessful Eisenhower sulphide followed by the Queen Elizabeth coronation sulphide.  Millefiori paperweight production was resumed in 1957 and lampwork paperweights were re-introduced in the early 1970s.  Baccarat stopped making this type of fine glass paperweights in 2002.

You can read more about the Baccarat paperweights in the book Baccarat Paperweights - two centuries of beauty by Paul Dunlop or one of the older books on paperweights in general, such as The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights by Paul Hollister or World Paperweights by Robert Hall.

Large Size:  Just under 2 7/8" diameter by 1 7/8" high.    The base is slightly convex. 
Signature:  Unsigned but I guarantee that this is an original Baccarat product or prototype.     
Condition:   Excellent condition.  The paperweight has some minor wear on the edge of the base, but no chips, cracks, or scratches were found on inspection.  There are some striations in the glass which are not damage but were flaws from when it was made.   

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture of the paperweight
Closeup view
Profile view
Base
Side view
$95 postage paid in the US.  

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

Click on the picture to see a larger image
Rare Baccarat 1952-1953 Experimental or Prototype Dwight Eisenhower Sulphide Paperweight
5198 Baccarat 1976 Mount Rushmore Sulphide with Red and White Double Overlay and Blue Ground.  dated 1976.  This modern sulphide paperweight features a very large three dimensional figure of the Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota depicting the four presidents heads George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln.  It has a red and white double overlay and a transparent blue ground.  The paperweight is faceted with a large oval top facet and eight oval side facets.  There is a footed base.  The sulphide was designed by Joseph Goy.  It is signed with the Baccarat acid etch logo, the edition number number "690/1000" (of which only 789 were made), and the date "1976".  This is the largest of the modern Baccarat sulphide paperweights.

Unlike most other Baccarat sulphide paperweights, this paperweight was made in only one format with a red and white overlay and blue ground.  There were no variations.  According to Dunlop, the edition was planned for 1,000 paperweights but only 789 were actually made.     

Sulphides are cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  The finest French sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself. 

Baccarat was founded in 1776 in Alsace-Lorraine with the name of Verrerie de Sainte Anne.  The original location was near the town of Baccarat.  Today the firm is known as Compagnie des Cristalleries de Baccarat.  Most collectors refer to three periods of Baccarat paperweight production.

  • 1845-1860 - Classic period
  • 1920-1934 - Dupont period
  • 1953-2002 - Modern period
This classification is definitely an over simplification.  The best millefiori and lampwork paperweights were made during the classic period (1845-1860).   Baccarat continued to make paperweights after the classic period, but little is known about the extent of the product line or who made the paperweights.  What is known is that by 1910, the offering in the catalog had dwindled to pansy paperweights, simple open concentric paperweights, and rock paperweights.  Popular lore attributes 1920-1934 Baccarat paperweights to a Mr. Dupont, who supposedly was the last worker at Baccarat to know the secrets of paperweight making.  These paperweights were sold at a Baccarat retail shop in Paris. No collector or scholar ever met Mr. Dupont although at least one visited the Baccarat factory and asked to meet with him.  The weights stopped appearing in the shop in 1934.

In 1952, Paul Jokelson approached Baccarat with the idea of making sulphide paperweights again.  In 1953 Baccarat resumed paperweight production with a series of sulphide paperweights the first of which were the unsuccessful Eisenhower sulphide followed by the Queen Elizabeth coronation sulphide.  Millefiori paperweight production was resumed in 1957 and lampwork paperweights were re-introduced in the early 1970s.  Baccarat stopped making this type of fine glass paperweights in 2002.

You can read more about the Baccarat paperweights in his book Baccarat Paperweights - two centuries of beauty by Paul Dunlop or one of the older books on paperweights in general, such as The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights by Paul Hollister or World Paperweights by Robert Hall.

Very Large Size:  It is oval shaped, 4 1/16" wide by 3 1/2" by 1 15/16" high.  The blue transparent base is ground flat.  The paperweight is faceted with one large oval top facet and eight oval side facets and is footed. 
Signature:  The paperweight is signed an acid etched Baccarat mark on the base, along with the date (1976) and the edition number.  
Condition:   Excellent condition.  I found minor wear on the base but no damage. 

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture of the paperweight
Closeup
Profile view
Base
Baccarat logo, edition number, and date on base
Side view
$195 postage paid in the US.  

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

Click on the picture to see a larger image
Baccarat 1976 Mount Rushmore Sulphide with Red and White Double Overlay and Blue Ground
3454
Antique Clichy Sulphide Paperweight of Victoria and Albert. circa 1851.  Clichy Sulphide paperweight featuring Queen Victoria (1819-1901) and Prince Albert (1819-1861).  The sulphide is fairly high in the dome of the paperweight and is over a clear ground.  It is believed that this paperweight may have been made for the 1851 Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London.  Prince Albert conceived of the exhibition which was considered the first world's fair.  The exhibition was intended to advance the arts and sciences.  A wonderful example.

Note:  This was a difficult paperweight to photograph due to the clear glass and white sulphide.  Some of the pictures look darker but you can rest assured that the glass is clear crystal, although some striations (sugaring) are visible. 

Sulphides are cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  The finest French sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself.

The Clichy factory was founded at Billancourt near Paris in 1837.  Shortly after that it moved to Clichy-la-Garenne, which gave the factory its best known name.  They stayed in operation until about the 1870s. 

Most authors agree that this is a Clichy paperweight, but there are some older books that attribute it to Baccarat in France or even to New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  The Bergstrom Mahler Museum has an identical paperweight which they attribute to Clichy.  The Art Institute of Chicago has a version in which the sulphide was colored before being encased.  This paperweight, attributed to Clichy, was included in the 1978 Corning Museum of Glass "Paperweights - Flowers which clothe the meadows" exhibition.  The Jokelson Collection had a variation with an uncolored (white) sulphide over a green ground.  The Jokelson paperweight is also attributed to Clichy.

Size:  Just over 2 1/2" diameter by 1 13/16" high.  The base is ground concave. 
Condition:  Outstanding condition.  No chips, cracks or scratches.  The paperweight has been professionally restored.  There are some striations (sugaring) and bubbles in the glass from when it was made.   
Signature:   Unsigned, but I guarantee this to be an authentic antique paperweight, most likely from Clichy in France.  Circa 1851.

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture
Closeup
Side view
Profile
Base
$845 postage paid in the US. 

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

Click on the picture to see a larger image
Antique Clichy Sulphide Paperweight of Victoria and Albert
1539 Vintage American George Washington Sulphide Paperweight - Made by Eustachius and Ursula Koering.  dated 1949.  This vintage sulphide paperweight features a sulphide bust of George Washington.  Although it is encased in poor quality glass partially obscuring sulphide, it is significant in that it is one of the earliest confirmed examples of an American made sulphide paperweight.  The sulphide was sculpted by the well known illustrator Ursula Koering and encased by her glassworker father Eustachius W. Koering, possibly at the Koering Glass Company in Vineland, NJ.  The sulphide rests on a ground of clear glass with a concentric bubble pattern on the base.  It is signed on the back of the sulphide "U.K. 3-18-49 EWK".  The Koerings also made sulphide paperweights of Abraham Lincoln, Pius XII, and a few others.  The plaster mold for the George Washington and other sulphides is in the collection of the Museum of American Glass (Millville, NJ).  These paperweights sold in 1949 for $4.95 to $8.75 each.  An important historical item worthy of a place in any sulphide paperweight collection.

Special thanks to Dr. James Barton for identifying the maker of this paperweight and for providing other background information about this maker.

Sulphides are cast objects (animals, flowers, people) made of a ceramic material that has properties similar to the surrounding glass.  They are normally white, but are also sometimes colored or even painted.  The objects are cast in a mold that copied or made directly from a medallion, coin or sculpture.  The finest French sulphides are cast in a mold made by a skilled artist.  Sometimes a sulphide will have a silvery appearance due to a thin layer of trapped bubbles between the glass and the sulphide itself. 

Eustachius Wolfgang Koering (1886-1970) was a principal in the Durand-Koering Glass Company founded in Vineland NJ in 1915 by Louis. J. Koering, George Deleruyelle, and Charles Durand.  Eustachius (sometimes spelled Eustacius) graduated from the Rensselaer Institute of Technology with a degree in Chemical Engineering in 1917.  His thesis topic was “Design for a Glass Factory with a 14 Pot Furnace.”  By the 1920s, Eustachius was the head of the Koering Glass Company (also of Vineland) in the 1920s and applied for a trademark in 1928.  He also applied for several patents for glass towel bars in 1924 and 1926.  I was unable to determine whether this was the same firm as Durand-Koering with a new name or a completely new firm. 

Ursula Koering (1921-1976), daughter of Eustachius, came from an artistic family.  Her father, Eustachius W. Koering, and her maternal grandfather, Amour LeFevre, were glassblowers.  Her paternal grandfather, Louis Koering, was a wagon maker and wood carver.  Ursula's mother, Mariette LeFevre Koering, was a painter.  When Ursula was a child, Mariette took her to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for Saturday art classes.  Ursula loved working in clay and took classes in clay modeling and ceramics, eventually graduating from the Philadelphia College of Art which was then part of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and was later renamed the Philadelphia Museum School of Art.  She was not able to develop a career as a sculptor and instead became an illustrator with children's magazine Jack and Jill and later for the publishers of children's books, illustrating more than two hundred books.  Her original love for sculpting and ceramics no doubt led to the collaboration with her father in producing the Koering sulphides in the late 1940s.

Large Size:  2 15/16" diameter by 2 3/8" high.  The base is concave with a snapped pontil mark (rough pontil) in the center.
Signature:  It is signed on the back of the sulphide "U.K. 3-18-49 EWK".  
Condition:   Very good condition although it was difficult to inspect completely.  The poor quality glass with extensive striations distracts from my efforts to examine the surface.  No chips or cracks were found on inspection.    

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture
Closeup
Another closeup
Profile
Base
Signature on back of sulphide
Side view
$145 postage paid in the US.

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

Click on the picture to see a larger image
Vintage American George Washington Sulphide Paperweight - Made by Eustachius and Ursula Koering
5203
Rare 1925 Edison Pioneers Sulphide Paperweight - Unknown Maker.  dated 1925.  This is a rare sulphide paperweight of Thomas Edison made to celebrate a meeting of The Edison Pioneers on or around February 11, 1925, which was Edison's 78th birthday.  The sulphide shows the name of the organization (The Edison Pioneers), Edison's bust, denotes that this was his 78th birthday, and even has a faint Edison signature below the profile.  The maker of this paperweight is unknown, although I assume it is an American glassworker.  The sulphide is also unusual in that the image of Edison appears to have a foil or thin metal backing.  I speculate that the maker was having trouble with cracks in the sulphide and added the backing to prevent further cracking.  The sulphide is entirely encased in glass so this is not a later addition.  The glass has a greenish grey tinge.  A great addition to any collection of sulphide paperweights or Thomas Edison memorabilia.    

I could not find another example of this paperweight.  It was probably made from a medallion or coin.  The New York Historical Society Luce Center has a square green glass paperweight in their collection with a such a medallion in the center (and an identical image) (Luce Center, INV.3505).

According to Wikipedia, "The Edison Pioneers was an organization composed of former employees of Thomas Edison who had worked with the inventor in his early years. Membership was limited to people who had worked closely with Edison before 1885.  On February 11, 1918, the Edison Pioneers met for the first time, on the 71st birthday of Edison. There were 37 people at the first meeting."  

Medium Large Size:  Just over 2 1/2" diameter by 1 7/8" high.  The base is ground flat.   
Condition:  Good condition with some scratches on the body and on the base.  There is one noticeable 3/8" chip on the edge of the base.  There are cracks in the sulphide - which happened when it was made.
Signature:  Unsigned.  Unknown maker, but probably made by an American glass maker.  

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links: 

Large picture of the paperweight
Closeup
Profile
Chip on edge of base
Base
Side view
SOLD.  

Click on the picture to see a larger image.

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Rare 1925 Edison Pioneers Sulphide Paperweight - Unknown Maker
2228
Antique New England Glass Company Sulphide Paperweight of Lajos Kossuth. circa 1851.  Antique Sulphide paperweight featuring Lajos Kossuth, former Governor-President of Hungary.  It is inscribed on the back "EX-GOVERNOR OF HUNGARY SET AT LIBERTY BY THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1851".

Kossuth was a political reformer who fought for liberty for Hungary and held the office of Governor-President from April 14 to August 11, 1849.  He was appointed to this position after the declaration of Hungarian independence from the Hapsburg Monarchy.  He was widely honored during his lifetime as a freedom fighter and advocate of democracy in Europe.  He demanded parliamentary government for Hungary and constitutional government for the rest of Austria. After abdicating the post of Governor-President he was effectively under house arrest until he was allowed to leave the Ottoman Empire in September 1851 on the American frigate Mississippi.  He then toured Britain and the United States in a futile effort to get support for his cause.  He won favor in New England and souvenirs and other commemorative items were created to celebrate his visit.  This paperweight was probably one of the commemorative objects created around the time of his visit.  Some authors suggest the inscription refers to US support of his cause.  Instead, I think it may refer to his rescue from house arrest by the US. 

New England Glass Company (NEGC) operated in Cambridge, Massachusetts from 1818 to 1888.  You can read about paperweights from the New England Glass Company in the book by Hawley, The Art of the Paperweight  - The Boston & Sandwich and New England Glass Companies

Most texts attribute this paperweight to the New England Glass Factory.  It is believed that this paperweight may have been made for the 1851 Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London.  However, the attribution is subject to challenge and the precise origin of this sulphide paperweight remains elusive.  The Bergstrom Mahler Museum has an identical paperweight which they attribute to Clichy.  Hawley attributes this to NEGC in his 1997 book The Art of the Paperweight  - The Boston & Sandwich and New England Glass Companies.  However, in his latest 2011 book on NEGC, he states that no firm evidence exists for this attribution, except that the specific gravity and fluorescence match that of NEGC.  Hollister discusses this paperweight in his Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights and also states that their is no firm evidence tying the paperweight to NEGC or any other factory.  My own opinion is that the glass quality is more typical of NEGC than the French factories.  It may have originated in Europe or at another American factory.

Ignore the glare from the lights.  It was difficult to photograph this paperweight.  The sulphide is white. 

Size:  2 9/16" diameter by 1 11/16" high.  The base is ground concave.
Condition:  Outstanding condition.  No chips, cracks or scratches.  The paperweight has been professionally restored.
Signature:  Unsigned, but I guarantee this to be an authentic antique paperweight, most likely from the New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Circa 1851
Execution:  Very good, although there are striations and bubbles in the glass.  Some of the Kossuth Sulphides have the name KOSSUTH on the edge.  It is not visible on this example. 

For extra pictures, click on the picture at the right and the following links:

Large picture of the paperweight
Close-up View
View of Back
Profile View
$295 postage paid in the US.

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Revised 6/27/2020